Can You Ground Your Golf Club In A Sand Trap?

As such, a golfer is prohibited from grounding their club in the sand in a bunker because it’s considered a hazard.

Beginning in 2019, however, golfers will be able to move loose impediments in the sand to keep a golfer from hitting rocks and sticks and twigs in a bunker.

Can you ground a club in a hazard?

Grounding Your Club in a Hazard

Practice swings may be taken inside a hazard as long as you don’t touch the ground, sand, or water with your club. The top of the grass may be touched during a practice swing. The penalty for grounding your club is loss of the hole in Match Play or a two-shot penalty in Stroke Play.

Can you ground your club in a fairway bunker?

Penalty Strokes

It is treated as an area that the USGA defines as “through the green,” which includes the fairway, rough and all other areas on the course that are not bunkers or hazards. The penalty for grounding your club in a sand bunker, or hitting the sand on a practice swing, is two strokes.

Why can’t you ground your club in a bunker?

Rule: Grounding Your Club In A Bunker. The reason you can’t ground your club in a bunker is that you might (a) be able to move enough sand to improve your lie and (b) you might be able to “test the surface,” i.e. figure out if there’s a lot of sand under your ball, not much sand, soft sand, hard sand, rocks, etc.

What are golf rule changes for 2019?

2019 Rule: Under Rule 11.1, for all accidental deflections, including when the ball hits the player or opponent or their equipment or caddies: ➢ There will be no penalty and the ball will be played as it lies (with limited exceptions).